Word of the Week: Tatendrang

Aug 3, 2012

Every Friday, Germany.info and The Week in Germany highlight a different "Word of the Week" in the German language that may serve to surprise, delight or just plain perplex native English speakers.

Tatendrang

Hiking Enlarge image Hiking (© picture-alliance/Cathy and Gordon Illg/OKAPIA)

Have you ever leapt out of bed on a particular morning flooded with the uncontrollable urge to get something done, such as hit the gym, clean up your home, or finally start writing that novel you've already mapped out in your mind? Then you were gripped by a sense of "Tatendrang."

Germans are often defined in international organizations, when experts suggest how to work with folks from all over the world, as "task oriented people." Such generic cultural cliches may not, of course, apply in each and every individual case. (Some German teenagers, for instance, may exhibit the same lack of "Tatendrang" when their parents suggest they clean up their rooms as many of their similarly cheeky and rebellious counterparts all over the world.)

So "Tatendrang" - which literally means "action urge" - describes that feeling you have when you just can't wait to start getting stuff done. Another in a long and proud line of awesome German compound nouns, it is based on the words "Tat" (action, deed, task) and "Drang" (urge). (This is not to be confused, however, with "Tatort" (Scene of the Crime), which just happens to be the most popular and longest-running detective series on German television.)

Clearly the opposite early morning urge (rising early is another classic German cultural trait) to "Tatendrang" would be the desire to hit the snooze button and sleep in. People who do not like mornings in Germany are, moreover, known as "Morgenmuffel" (morning curmudgeons, morning grumpus) - and they are definitely a minority in a nation of "task oriented" early risers.

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