Word of the Week: Frühjahrsmüdigkeit

Apr 17, 2014

Frühjahrsmüdigkeit Enlarge image (© dpa - Report) When spring arrives, not everyone is struck purely with joy and vitality. Some are just the opposite, developing a fatigue that Germans call Frühjahrsmüdigkeit ("spring tiredness").

In German, the word Frühjahr means "early year" - as opposed to Frühling, which means "spring." But regardless, Frühjahrsmüdigkeit is usually attributed to weariness, laziness and lethargy in the springtime -- generally between mid-March to mid-April.

Do you find yourself staring at the cherry blossom tree outside your window, unable to concentrate on your work? Has it become more difficult to wake up early? Do you get headaches more often than usual? Do you spend weekends on the couch rather than outdoors? Then you might be suffering from Frühjahrsmüdigkeit.

Frühjahrsmüdigkeit Enlarge image (© dpa) "Spring tiredness", however, is a phenomenon that has not yet been scientifically confirmed. In fact, it stands in contradiction to what Americans call "spring fever", which usually refers to a surge in energy. But some scientists speculate that springtime weariness comes as a result of changing seasons, which leads to hormonal readjustments in the body. When the days get longer, the body increases its production of seratonin and reduces its production of melatonin. During this transition, the body may be more tired than usual. Additionally, fluctuating temperatures can affect blood pressure, which may also lead to tiredness.

But the scientific basis for Frühjahrsmüdigkeit is still being studied. And there's also plenty of Germans who speak about Frühlingsgefühle ("spring feelings") -- a state of vitality, joy and liveliness that is comparible to "spring fever".

But these aren't the only German words that deal with the changing seasons: while Americans talk about "spring cleaning", Germans  have their own word for it: Frühjahrsputz ("early-year cleaning"). Perhaps it's the cleaning that leads to feelings of Frühjahrsmüdigkeit. Maybe it's the weather or the allergies. Or perhaps it's just an excuse for slacking off.

Frühlingsmüdigkeit Enlarge image (© picture alliance/chromorange) Whatever the cause may be, one thing is certain: at this time of year in Germany, you're likely to hear complaints about Frühjahrsmüdigkeit, while also hearing uplifting comments about the Frühlingsgefühle that come with the warm weather. Which begs the question: which one do you feel today?

By Nicole Glass, Editor of The Week in Germany

© Germany.info

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