German Heritage Texas Style

Starting in the 1840s, several thousand German immigrants were brought to the newly founded Republic of Texas through the efforts of  a group of idealistic German noblemen, called the "Society of Noblemen" (Adelsverein). German settlements were built from the Texas coast to the land north of the Llano River, which was the ultimate destination of the immigrants. Despite great obstacles in getting their unsurveyed land grants, underfunding, the wars between US and and Mexico and finally the Civil war, the German communities did not only manage to survive but  flourished,  successfully blending their German heritage with traditional Texas hospitality. 

Fredericksburg
Der Lindenbaum German Restaurant Fredericksburg © Carol Barrington Der Lindenbaum German Restaurant Fredericksburg (© Carol Barrington) Fredricksburg's pride in German heritage speaks loudly through its website, which greets visitors with a boisterous "Willkommen"!
Fredericksburg, the county seat of Gillespie County, was founded in 1846 by a small group of settlers led by John O. Meusebach on a patch of land surveyed by Prince Karl of New Braunfels. The city was named Fredericksburg after Prince Frederick of Prussia, an influential member of the Adelsverein.
Each settler of the town received a lot and ten acres of farmland nearby. The town was laid out like the German villages along the Rhine, from which many of the colonists had come, with one long, wide Main Street that runs along Town Creek. Today the historic main street is lined with specialty stores that feature items crafted by Hill Country artisans, fine apparel, antiques and Texas wines.
The earliest houses in Fredericksburg were built in a humble manner, of post oak logs stuck upright in the ground. These were soon replaced by Fachwerkhäuser, built of upright timbers with the spaces between filled with rocks and then plastered or whitewashed. A distinctive landmark memorializing early Fredricksburgers is the Vereinskirche (Society Church), the octagonal Kaffeemühle (coffee mill), that housed several church congregations, and served as a school, community hall and fort. After its demolition, an exact replica with the original cornerstone was built in 1935.
Finding yourself in Fredricksburg, with its distinct German flair and historic buildings, is truly like finding yourself in a part of the Old World. Why not pay it a visit?

Fredericksburg

For an article about the Fredricksburg Oktoberfest please visit our site

German Fests in America
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New Braunfels
New Braunfels wears its German heritage on its sleeve. A proud mishmash of both Texas grit and German gemütlichkeit, it was founded by Prussian Prinz Karl of Solms Braunfels on Good Friday in 1845. The prince had been negotiating with authorities to bring German immigrants to the area.
New Braunfels, known as the "City of a Prince," had a major impact upon the immediate area as well as opening West Texas to a civilized economy. The many artisans and craftsmen among the 6,000 settlers generated industry and commerce for the entire central Texas area. In addition to economic growth this early colony brought religion, organized public education, and other socioeconomic benefits to the area.
But it wasn’t until the 1960’s that New Braunfels began to recognize the value and actively promote its German heritage. Determined to preserve the remaining German sites in the city, historians set out to revitalize the Sophienburg Museum and Archives, the Ferdinand Lindheimer Home, Conservation Plaza, and the Museum of Texas Handmade Furniture, all of which were of vital import to the German community.
     
New Braunfels

German Heritage Texas Style: Fredericksburg

Vereinskirche Museum © Al Rendon