Ambassador's Residence Features New Exhibit on Influential German Jews of the 19th Century

Sep 15, 2016

LBI Enlarge image (© www.Germany.info) The Residence of the German Ambassador is featuring a new exhibit that portrays influential German Jews from the founding of the German Empire in 1871 until the seizure of power by the National Socialists in 1933. Titled From Albert Einstein to Leo Baeck - German Jews in the Early 20th Century, the exhibit, which was produced by the Leo Baeck Institute, profiles well-known Jewish artists, scientists and thinkers of 20th century Germany.

During the opening ceremony on September 12, guests were treated to a musical composition by Harpist Melissa Tardiff Dvorak. Ambassador Peter Wittig and Leo Baeck Institute Executive Director Billy Weitzer greeted guests and discussed the importance of the exhibit and how it relates to the exhibit that the Residence featured last year.

LBI Enlarge image (© www.Germany.info) "Focusing on the lives of Jews in Weimar Berlin, (our previous exhibition) revealed the diverse range of German public cultural spheres which were often spearheaded by Jewish artists and intellectuals," Ambassador Wittig said. "Some of these influential 'luminaries' - Albert Einstein probably being the most widely known among them - are featured in this new exhibition."

"You will be seeing, for instance, a suitcase used by Dr. Lilian Singer, a Jewish-German physician and war refugee who practiced medicine in Europe, India and Pakistan before settling in the U.S. I can only encourage you to take your time and study the objects on display here," he continued.

LBI Enlarge image (© www.Germany.info) The LBI exhibit in the Residence features various historic objects in glass cases and accompanying descriptions that provide a glimpse into the lives of German Jews of the 20th century.

By Nicole Glass, Editor of The Week in Germany

© Germany.info

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