Word of the Week

Every Friday, Germany.info and The Week in Germany highlight a different "Word of the Week" in the German language that may serve to surprise, delight or just plain perplex native English speakers.

Word of the Week: Schenkelklopfer

Jul 22, 2016 | Germany.info
Schenkelklopfer

A Schenkelklopfer is a simple, corny but effective joke that evokes serious laughter. The direct translation is "thigh slapper" but in English, the term "knee slapper" is a more commonly used equivalent. This type of joke is so funny that it may have listeners slapping their knees while laughing.

Word of the Week: Sparwitz

Jul 14, 2016 | Germany.info
sparwitz

We all know someone who tries to make jokes that no one laughs at. Some people are notoriously good at telling jokes that aren't funny (or that no one comprehends). It would be ironic to call their attempts "jokes" in the first place, so Germans have a better word for them: Sparwitze!

Word of the Week: Bananenflankenkönig

Jul 8, 2016 | Germany.info
Bananenflanke

Sad news for all of us: Germany was defeated by France in the European Championship semi-final on July 7. But that won't stop us from learning some more German soccer terminology. Our last soccer word for this summer is a fun one: Bananenflankenkönig.

Word of the Week: Notbremse

Jun 29, 2016 | Germany.info
Notbremse

If you speak German, you've probably heard the word Notbremse ("emergency brake"), but have you heard it in the context of a soccer game?

Word of the Week: Fallrückzieher

Jun 24, 2016 | Germany.info
Fallrückzieher

As the 2016 European Championship continues, let's take a look at another German soccer word that may come in handy if you're watching the games in German: Fallrückzieher.

Word of the Week

Word of the Week

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