Word of the Week

Every Friday, Germany.info and The Week in Germany highlight a different "Word of the Week" in the German language that may serve to surprise, delight or just plain perplex native English speakers. Access our archive here!

Word of the Week: 'Schnäppchen'

Apr 15, 2011 | Germany.info
Sale sign

In Germany a real bargain is a "Schnäppchen," which is not to be confused with a "little Schnapps" (although it can be that too ... as a "Schnäppschen"!).

Word of the Week: Wintermärchen

Feb 4, 2011 | Germany.info
© colourbox

With a third of the US hit by the worst blizzard in decades, it seems almost cynical to talk about  Wintermärchen (winter’s tale). But the German word Wintermärchen is not about the weather. Instead it refers to the satirical verse-epic Deutschland. Ein Wintermärchen (Germany: A Winter’s Tale) written in 1843 by German-Jewish author Heinrich Heine and first published in 1844.

Word of the Week: Fingerspitzengefühl

Jan 14, 2011 | Germany.info
"Fingerspitzengefühl"

Compound nouns abound in the German language. One that applies well to a variety of scenarios yet is difficult to translate precisely into English is "Fingerspitzengefühl."

Word of the Week: Wutbürger

Jan 7, 2011 | Young Germany/Germany.info
The 2010 Word of the Year: Wutbürger

Over the course of the year, The Week in Germany will highlight a different "Word of the Week" in the German language that may serve to surprise, delight or just plain perplex native English speakers.

Word of the Week

Word of the Week

Word of the Week Dictionary

Missed a Word of the Week? Want to consult the growing Word of the Week dictionary? We have them listed from A to Z!

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With 100 million native speakers, German is the most commonly-spoken language in Europe. Around the world, 15.4 million people are learning German as a foreign language today. There are many good reasons for studying German, and a large number of resources, online and offline, to help you gain fluency in the language of Goethe, Gauß, and Grönemeyer.