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From Sea to Shining Sea: Anni Albers in America (1899–1994) (November 3)

Anni Albers, La Luz I, 1947.  Linen and metallic thread; 18½ x 32½” (47 x 82.5 cm).

Anni Albers, La Luz I, 1947.  Linen and metallic thread; 18½ x 32½“ (47 x 82.5 cm). The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, Bethany 1994.12.2 © 2021 The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Tim Nighswander/Imaging4Art, © The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Tim Nighswander/Imaging4Art

28.10.2021 - Article

Laura Muir in conversation with Ori Z Soltes about the German Bauhaus artist Anni Albers (Berlin 1899 – 1994 Orange, CT), who inspired a new generation of students through her teaching and produced an important body of writing on weaving.

Anni Albers (Berlin 1899 – 1994 Orange, CT) found her artistic identity at the renowned Bauhaus--but not where she expected to. The gender-restrictive conditions at the school pushed her to textile work. As the Nazis forced the Bauhaus closure, Anni and her already well-known husband, Joseph Albers, immigrated to the United States, where Joseph and later Anni were invited to teach at Black Mountain College in North Carolina. From there to New York and Yale University, while her husband gained renown as a teacher and practitioner of painting, Anni expanded her presence as an innovator in diverse textile media and styles, shaping a far-flung, influential career that resonates to this day.

The United States presented Albers with new opportunities to develop as a designer of both functional and purely artistic textiles. She inspired a new generation of students through her teaching and produced an important body of writing on weaving that was informed by her extensive travels to Central and Latin America. Her efforts in all these areas elevated the status of weaving as an art form and her reputation as a major artist within that field. In addition to opening professional doors, Albers migration allowed her to play a key role in promoting the Bauhaus and its ideas in the United States through her participation in exhibitions and generous donations to American museum collections.

Featuring Laura Muir , Associate Director of Academic and Public Programs and the Louis Miller Thayer Research Curator at the Harvard Art Museums in Cambridge MA in conversation with Ori Z Soltes, PhD, Teaching Professor at Georgetown University, Washington DC. 
This event is part of the virtual project “Identity, Art and Migration” which investigates US immigration of European refugees during the first half of the 20th century through the lens of seven artist case studies: Anni Albers, Friedel Dzubas, Eva Hesse, Rudi Lesser, Lily Renee, Arthur Szyk and Fritz Ascher.

Generously sponsored by the Consulate General of the Federal Republic of Germany in New York

Location & Time

November 3, 12:00pm EDT

Via Zoom. Please register here https://fritzaschersociety.org/exhibition-event/anni-albers/.


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